Online store: “Ancient Wisdom, Modern Kitchen: Recipes from the East for Health, Healing, and Long Life”

Ancient Wisdom, Modern Kitchen: Recipes from the East for Health, Healing, and Long Life

Award-Winner in the Cookbooks: International category of the 2010 International Book Awards

Ancient Wisdom, Modern Kitchen reveals how easy it is to tap into the 3,000-year-old secrets of the Eastern healing arts. This entertaining and easy-to-use book provides scores of delicious recipes, anecdotes about various herbs and foods, and all you need to know about acquiring ingredients—even if you don’t know the difference between a lotus seed and the lotus position.Highlighting “superfoods,” such as goji berries, as well as more familiar ingredients like ginger, garlic, and mint, Ancient Wisdom, Modern Kitchen includes indispensible information:• An overview of traditional Chinese medicine, herbs, and food therapy
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List Price: $ 19.95

Price: $ 19.95




Question by darkvale: Iis there natural medicine to promote healing muscles?
I’ve just had surgery and had to be cut open like 9 inches or better. Is there natural things i can take to promote healing and immune system.

Best answer:

Answer by April G
No, just a good diet of low fat, lots of protein, green leafy veggies, and fruit, dairy. Avoid fast foods, fried foods, grease.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!
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This entry was posted on Friday, October 14th, 2011 at 2:50 pm and is filed under Kindle EBooks. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

3 Comments

  1. Al L. Stone says:
    15 of 15 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Someone gets it, someone actually gets it, April 22, 2010
    By 
    Al L. Stone (Santa Monica, CA USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    I very much like “Ancient Wisdom, Modern Kitchen”. This is a very smart book that truly does provide Westerners with some great healthful recipes for both Chinese medicine practitioners and laypersons.

    It appears to be a response to the gaping holes in the marketplace for a decent book on Chinese medicine dietetics. While their stated purpose (articulated in their cover letter that accompanied the review copy) is to provide practitioners with a book to suggest to their patients, I also believe that it is a great book for Chinese medicine practitioners as well.

    Henry Lu’s Chinese Natural Cures: Traditional Methods for Remedies and Prevention and Paul Pitchford’s Healing with Whole Foods: Asian Traditions and Modern Nutrition have pretty much owned the marketplace since I’ve been following such things, but this book promises to rise to the top of the list. It certainly has in my mind. The Lu and Pitchford books are good at listing various herbs that are edible and various foods that have medicinal properties.

    However, Ancient Wisdom, Modern Kitchen is more of a cookbook than a list of food/herbs (though it includes both). They’re simple, though they do not appear to skimp on taste or presentation. There are also copious variations that you can explore as well as little sidebars that provide additional insight as to the cultural backstory regarding various ingredients.

    This book is great for laypersons in that it describes the benefits of a particular recipe in common terms, but it also includes the same information using TCM terms practitioner. Many (but not all) require that one has access to an Asian market.

    The main portion of this book, the recipes, are organized by main dishes, soups, desserts, etc. There are also chapters that explain some of the basics of Chinese medicine. What the authors present is the tried-and-true Chinese medicine that is most commonly taught in American schools. I consider this a good thing. There is plenty of good information out there, but it isn’t all translated into English. As such, some authors have to fill in the gaps with their own musings. This doesn’t seem to be the case with this book. What you read here will not be confusing when comparing the content to other books on Chinese medicine.

    I look forward to trying out some of these recipes because of their health benefits, but also because they’re so well written.

    -Al Stone, L.Ac., DAOM
    April 22, 2010

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    ... on July October 14th, 2011
  2. Sure Lances Alot says:
    9 of 9 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The best book of it’s type., March 28, 2010
    By 
    Sure Lances Alot (Portland) –

    I just picked this up and have to say that I am very impressed.
    It is filled with simple yet healthful recipes. The majority of the recipes are traditional recipes from China, Japan, and Korea and will require a trip to your local or online Asian market. For each recipe they discuss the health conditions the dish is beneficial for from both Eastern and Western medical perspectives. Whenever appropriate, the authors share snippets of insight. It also includes a section discussing 100 “super foods.”
    This book is perfect for both the layperson and for those experienced with Chinese Medicine.

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    ... on July October 14th, 2011
  3. Daphne Lurie "Daphne Lurie" says:
    6 of 6 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Ancient Wisdom, Modern Jewel, March 15, 2010
    By 
    Daphne Lurie “Daphne Lurie” (San Diego, California) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-help/amazon-verified-purchase/184-1837556-3005500', ‘AmazonHelp’, ‘width=400,height=500,resizable=1,scrollbars=1,toolbar=0,status=1′);return false; “>What’s this?)

    The book, “Ancient Wisdom, Modern Kitchen” is a jewel. I am learning so much as I read through it. The authors present information about Eastern tradition, health and cooking in ways that are as accessible as they are illuminating. The recipes are wonderful, and I am enjoying the anecdotal observations, personal accounts, and dashes of humor sprinkled throughout. This is a beautiful, comprehensive, thoughtfully-laid out piece of work that edifies the mind and spirit, as well as the stomach. Well-done!

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    ... on July October 14th, 2011